CHAI at a glance

We work on the issues of HIV/AIDS, malaria, and childhood diseases, as well as expanding human resources for health, increasing access to health care and improving the efficiency of the health commodity marketplace.

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Smart partnerships

We work in partnership with governments. Rather than implementing additional programs and parallel health systems, we work at the invitation of governments to strengthen and sustain their own capacity to provide long-term healthcare to their citizens.

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Big impact

We take on the programs most likely to create massive and lasting change. CHAI aims to work on large, catalytic, "game-changing" opportunities rather than small implementation projects.

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Urgent action

We are action-oriented and impatient. It is unacceptable that millions of people continue to die every year from diseases that we can prevent and cost-effectively treat. CHAI's 600+ staff are driven by this urgency. We work in many areas where others can't or won't.

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Business approach

Globally, CHAI negotiates price reductions for medications and diagnostics and works to increase the quality of these commodities. To date, 72 countries use medications whose prices were reduced through CHAI’s creative “incentive engineering” with companies.

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Health Care for Cambodia's Children

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Meet Basil and Tavry, two children in Cambodia who have benefited from the Clinton Foundation's pediatric and health access programs.

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Focus on Mothers and Children

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When Joyce Dixon, a lifelong resident of Malawi's Machinga District, became pregnant, her health began declining rapidly.

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Business Approach

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CHAI’s work involves taking business, management and marketplace principles and applying these to global health in order to save lives.

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The Heroes of the Laboratory

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Backlogs kill. And they are found in labs across the developing world.

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“It just struck me that this was a problem that cried out for organization and entrepreneurial skill. And that for a relatively small amount of money, we could have a huge impact.”